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CHIP & Medicaid

Children in Texas without health insurance might be able to get low-cost or free health coverage through Children's Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

Children's Medicaid is a health care program for children in low-income families. CHIP is a health care program for children whose families earn too much to get Medicaid but cannot afford health insurance.

To get Medicaid or CHIP, a child must be age 18 and younger (in some cases children with disabilities age 19 and 20 can get Medicaid). They must also be a Texas resident and a U.S. citizen or qualified non-citizen.

When you apply, we'll ask about your family's income to see which programs your child can get.

CHIP

  • The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) offers low-cost health coverage for children from birth through age 18. CHIP is designed for families who earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid but cannot afford to buy private health coverage.

  • We offer CHIP in more than 20 counties in the Jefferson and Harris Service Areas.

How does CHIP work?

  • CHIP provides health care to children who qualify. If your child qualifies, you will need to select a health plan and the doctor you want for your child’s health-care needs. Pick Texas Children’s Health Plan to select from our doctors.

  • Your child’s doctor can help you find a specialist if your child needs one. The most a family will pay is $50 per year for all the children who qualify, but most families pay $35 per year or less. You will also need to pay additional co-payments for some services.

Services covered by CHIP & Medicaid

These services are provided by health plans. If your child gets Medicaid or CHIP, you will choose a plan from the ones available in your service area.

  • Regular checkups at the doctor and dentist

  • Medicine and vaccines

  • Hospital care and services

  • X-rays and lab tests

  • Vision and hearing care

  • Access to medical specialists and mental health care

  • Treatment of special health needs and pre-existing conditions

The number of children you have and the amount you earn determines if your children can get CHIP. See the income chart to see if you qualify.

 

See co-payment costs

 

Use the chart to find out if your children may be able to get CHIP or Medicaid. Find your family size on the left side of this chart.

 

Follow that row to the right. Is your family's yearly income less than the amount shown on the right side? If so, your children may be able to get Medicaid or CHIP. Children of families that earn higher incomes may still be able to get health coverage in some cases. Call us if you have questions.

The difference between CHIP and Medicaid is based on your family’s income.

 

Find out if you qualify for CHIP or Medicaid.

Children with Disabilities

Children with disabilities can get long-term services and supports through Medicaid. These services can include:

  • Regular checkups at the doctor and dentist

  • Medicine and vaccines

  • Hospital care and services

  • X-rays and lab tests

  • Vision and hearing care

  • Access to medical specialists and mental health care

  • Treatment of special health needs and pre-existing conditions

Income Guidelines for Children's Medicaid

Your income is the money you get paid before taxes are taken out. Find your family size on the table below. If your monthly income is the same or less, your child might get Children's Medicaid.

Monthly

Family Income

$1,428

$1,931

$2,434

$2,938

$3,441

$3,944

$4,447

$4,950

$504

Family Members

(Adults plus children)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

For each additional person, add:

*A family of one might be a child who does not live with a parent or other relative.

If your income is higher than the limits listed above, check the limits below for CHIP.

Income Guidelines for CHIP

Your income is the money you get paid before taxes are taken out. Find your family size on the table below. If your monthly income is the same or less, your child might get CHIP.

Monthly Family Income1

$2,158

$2,918

$3,679

$4,439

$5,200

$5,960

$6,721

$761

Family Members (Adults plus children)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

For each additional person, add:

**A family of one might be a child who does not live with a parent or other relative.

How Much Does It Cost?

Children's Medicaid is free.

  • If we find your child can get Children's Medicaid, there is no cost to receive services.

  • CHIP fees vary based on your income.

  • If we find your child can get CHIP, your enrollment fee and co-pays will be based on your family's income. Enrollment fees are $50 or less per family, per year.

  • Co-pays for doctor visits and medicine range from $3 to $5 for lower-income families and $20 to $35 for higher-income families.

I'm a low-income parent, and I need health care for my child.

Children's Medicaid is a health care program for children in low-income families. Services include regular checkups with a doctor, dentist visits, and medicine and vaccines.

Frequently Asked Questions

Call the CHIP program administrator at 1-877-543-7669.

How do I renew our CHIP coverage?

Call the CHIP program administrator at 1-877-543-7669.

I need health care for my children, but I make too much money to get Medicaid.

Children's Health Insurance Program is a health care program for children whose families earn too much to get Medicaid but can't afford insurance.

CHIP offers many of the same services as Medicaid but does not cover long-term services and supports.

To find out if you can get CHIP, apply for Medicaid and we'll determine if you qualify.

I'm a parent or caretaker of a child getting Medicaid, and I need health insurance.

Medicaid for Parents and Caretakers is a health care program for some low-income adults caring for a child who has Medicaid.

I can get health insurance for my family through my employer, but I can't afford the premiums.

Health Insurance Premium Payment is a program that helps adults with a family member on Medicaid pay for their employer-sponsored health insurance premiums.

Social Security

Benefit Eligibility Screening Tool

The Benefit Eligibility Screening Tool helps you determine whether or not you qualify for benefits that Social Security administers. Based on your answers to questions, this tool will list benefits for which you might be eligible and provides you with information about how to qualify and apply. Visit BEST at ssabest.benefits.gov.

 

Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Income

The Social Security Administration has two benefit programs that can help with medical needs.

 

Supplemental Security Income is a federal program managed by the Social Security Administration that offers monthly cash assistance to help pay for personal and medical needs, such as food, shelter, clothing, and medical and dental care not covered under health insurance. You must apply and be approved for SSI based on your family income.

 

Social Security Disability Insurance is a federal benefits program managed by the Social Security Administration that offers monthly payments to people who have disabilities or special healthcare needs.

Organizations

children who have survived an early brain injury that causes weakness on one side of the body. They maintain a website with information to help parents care for their children. CHASA also helps families find support in their community and connect to other parents who have a child with the same condition.

Team Luke Hope for Minds

Team Luke Hope for Minds is a non-profit organization dedicated to enriching the lives of children with a brain injury and providing hope for their families through support and education. Families who qualify can receive financial help for items such as therapies, treatments and equipment. Families can receive up to $5,000 each year with a lifetime cap of $15,000. For those who don’t qualify, the organization provides up to $2,000/lifetime. Team Luke Hope for Minds serves children 18 and younger. Call 512-845-1466 or visit www.teamlukehopeforminds.org to learn more.

 

Brain Injury and Your Child, is a resource guide created by Team Luke Hope for Minds for parents and caregivers of children with brain injuries. Contact Team Luke Hope for Minds to request a copy.

Texas Parent 2 Parent

Texas Parent 2 Parent is committed to improving the lives of children who have disabilities, chronic illness or special health care needs. TxP2P empowers families to be strong advocates through parent-to-parent support, resource referral and education. In addition, TxP2P educates professionals about the unique needs of children with IDD. Learn more at txp2p.org or by calling 512-458-8600 (Toll free: 866-896-6001).

Texas Education Agency

y is the state agency that oversees primary and secondary public education. Contact your regional Education Service Center for technical assistance, information about special education practices, specific topic information, training opportunities, location or identification of special education resources. Find your local ESC at https://tea.texas.gov/regional_services/esc/.

Medicaid

You may qualify for benefits such as Medicaid, STAR+PLUS, Medicaid BuyIn for Adults and STAR Kids. The particular program you qualify for is dependent on your income, your disability status and your age. Learn more at yourtexasbenefits.com or call 2-1-1.

 Applying for Medicaid  

Remember that for many of the programs available in Texas, you have to first apply and be accepted into Medicaid.

 

  • Apply online for Medicaid at yourtexasbenefits.com.

  • Apply over the phone by calling 2-1-1 (877-541-7905). Press option 1 twice to connect with a representative.

  • Use the "Find Office" search engine on Your Texas Benefits to locate the nearest HHS benefit office.

 

Once you are enrolled in Medicaid, know how to contact your service coordinator or case manager. This person is the go-to person to get into any waivers or entitlement programs. They coordinate all the services you receive through your selected managed care organization. Many people don't know they have a service coordinator. Call your MCO to find out who it is, or request to be assigned one.

 Local Community Health Clinics  

If you don’t have health coverage of any kind, you can search for a Community Health Center on the Texas Association of Community Health Centers website, https://www.tachc.org/find-healthcarecenter. Community Health Centers provide services for the uninsured and underinsured.

  • 2-1-1 Texas has a comprehensive list of local programs at http://www.211texas.org/guidedsearch/. Look under the section "Health/Medical,” then under "Medical Expense Assistance" and search by location and type. You can also call 2-1-1 (877-541-7905), press option 1.

 

  • Medicare.gov has a list of pharmaceutical companies that offer assistance programs for the drugs those companies manufacture. Check for available programs and information on how to apply at medicare.gov/pharmaceutical-assistance-program.

 

  • 2-1-1 Texas can help you find benefit information and financial assistance. Call 2-1-1 (877-541-7905) or search for services online at 211texas.org/.

Apply for disability benefits as soon as you become disabled. If you are ready to apply now:

  • Complete your application online at ssa.gov/applyfordisability.

  • Call the toll-free telephone number, at 800-772-1213, TTY 800-325-0778.

  • Call or visit your local Social Security office, listed at ssa.gov/locator.

  • STAR+PLUS Waiver Program can provide a person with the care they need to live in their home. The STAR+PLUS Waiver Program isn’t the same as Star-Plus Medicaid. It’s a waiver that complements the program.

  • Community First Choice provides many of the same services as the waivers, but allows you to bypass the lengthy waitlist of other waivers.

  • Texas Technology Access Program - University of Texas offers short- and long-term assistive technology lending programs. Visit https://tatp.edb.utexas.edu/ to learn more, request a device and find links to other resources, or call 800-828-7839 (Austin: 512-232-0740).

 

  • UsedHME, usedHME.com, is a free listing service where people can buy, sell or find donated used home medical equipment.

 

  • Rehabilitation Services Volunteer Project (Regional Resource - Houston) provides physical rehabilitation services and equipment to uninsured people with disabilities. The medical equipment division provides durable medical equipment such as wheelchairs, bathroom equipment and walkers to people with disabilities, regardless of diagnosis, who lack access to this equipment. Learn more at rsvptexas.org or by calling 855-825-RSVP (855-825-7787).

 

  • DME Exchange of Dallas (Regional Resource) collects, refurbishes and sanitizes donated equipment and distributes the equipment to people whose income and insurance will not cover doctor-ordered equipment. Learn more at dfwdmeexchange.org or call 214-997-3639.

 

  • Project MEND (Regional Resource - San Antonio) offers medical equipment and assistive technology to people who cannot afford the items they need or have gaps in insurance coverage. The program repairs refurbishes and sanitizes donations of gently used medical equipment. They serve children, aging adults, veterans, their spouses and children and persons who are homeless. Learn more at projectmend.org or call 210-223-6363.

 

  • Texas Ramps builds wheelchair ramps for disabled or elderly persons who cannot afford to buy one. To learn more or to request a ramp, visit texasramps.org, or email info@texasramps.org or call 214-675-1230.

  • Medicaid Medical Transportation Program helps people with Medicaid benefits get to the doctor’s office, dentist, hospital, drug store or any other location where they receive Medicaid services. To use this service, you must not have access to any other means of transportation. To schedule a ride, call:

  • Houston/Beaumont area: 855-687-4786

  • Dallas area: 855-687-3255

  • Everywhere else: 877-633-8747 (877-MED-TRIP)

  • Before you call for a ride, you must have already made a doctor’s appointment. To obtain a ride, call at least two workdays in advance. If you travel a long distance to your appointment, be sure to call at least five work days in advance. When you call, have the following information ready to share:

  • Medicaid ID or social security number

  • Address where you will need to be picked up

  • Name, address and phone number of the provider

  • The date and time of your doctor's visit

  • If you or your children have any special needs so they send the right type of vehicle.

Covid-19

Basics of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (Covid-19)

Watch for Symptoms

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills

  • Cough

  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

  • Fatigue

  • Muscle or body aches

  • Headache

  • New loss of taste or smell

  • Sore throat

  • Congestion or runny nose

  • Nausea or vomiting

  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19. Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Feeling Sick?

Check Symptoms with Self-Checker Get Tested for COVID-19

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing

  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

  • New confusion

  • Inability to wake or stay awake

  • Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Difference between COVID-19 & Flu

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2), and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses.

COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms and people can be contagious for longer. More information about the differences between flu and COVID-19 is available in the different sections below.

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.

While more is learned every day about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it, there is still a lot that is unknown. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

About COVID-19

  • COVID-19 is a dangerous disease caused by a virus discovered in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. It is very contagious and has quickly spread around the world.

  • COVID-19 most often causes respiratory symptoms that can feel much like a cold, a flu, or pneumonia, but COVID-19 can also harm other parts of the body.

  • Most people who catch COVID-19 have mild symptoms, but some people become severely ill.

  • Older adults and people who have certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

  • Hundreds of thousands of people have died from COVID-19 in the United States.

  • Vaccines against COVID-19 are safe and effective.

About the name

  • On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease: coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated COVID-19. ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is a coronavirus. The word corona means crown and refers to the appearance that coronaviruses get from the spike proteins sticking out of them.

Other coronaviruses

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can infect people and many animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. There are many types of coronaviruses, including some that give people a common head or chest cold. Other coronavirus diseases like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are extremely dangerous but are much less widespread than colds and COVID-19.

How Covid-19 Spreads

COVID-19 spreads when an infected person breathes out droplets and very small particles that contain the virus. These droplets and particles can be breathed in by other people or land on their eyes, noses, or mouth. In some circumstances, they may contaminate surfaces they touch. People who are closer than 6 feet from the infected person are most likely to get infected.

COVID-19 is spread in three main ways:

  • Breathing in air when close to an infected person who is exhaling small droplets and particles that contain the virus.

  • Having these small droplets and particles that contain virus land on the eyes, nose, or mouth, especially through splashes and sprays like a cough or sneeze.

  • Touching eyes, nose, or mouth with hands that have the virus on them.

Delta Variant

The Delta variant causes more infections and spreads faster than earlier forms of the virus that causes COVID-19. It might cause more severe illness than previous strains in unvaccinated people.

  • Vaccines continue to be highly effective at preventing hospitalization and death, including against this variant.

  • Fully vaccinated people with breakthrough infections from this variant appear to be infectious for a shorter period.

  • Get vaccinated and wear masks indoors in public spaces to reduce the spread of this variant.

 

About the Delta Variant in the US

Protect Yourself and Others

Anyone infected with COVID-19 can spread it, even if they do NOT have symptoms.

 

What You Need to Know

  • If you are not fully vaccinated and 2 or older, you should wear a mask in indoor public places.

  • In areas with high numbers of COVID-19 cases, consider wearing a mask in crowded outdoor settings and for activities with close contact with others who are not fully vaccinated.

  • Otherwise, you do not need to wear a mask in outdoor settings.

 

Learn more about what you can do to protect yourself and others and what you can do after you’ve been fully vaccinated.

 

COVID-19 and Animals

COVID-19 can spread from people to animals in some situations. Pet cats and dogs can sometimes become infected after close contact with people with COVID-19. Learn what you should do if you have pets.

Food

There is no evidence to suggest that handling food or consuming food is associated with COVID-19. Follow food safety guidelines when handling and cleaning fresh produce. Do not wash produce with soap, bleach, sanitizer, alcohol, disinfectant or any other chemical.

Drinking Water

There is also no current evidence that people can get COVID-19 by drinking water. The COVID-19 virus has not been detected in drinking water. Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or kill the virus that causes COVID-19.​

 

Natural Bodies of Water (Lakes, Oceans, Rivers)

There are no scientific reports of the virus that causes COVID-19 spreading to people through the water in lakes, oceans, rivers, or other natural bodies of water.

Wastewater

Genetic material from has been found in untreated wastewater. There is little evidence of infectious virus in wastewater, and no information to date that anyone has become sick with COVID-19 because of exposure to wastewater. Wastewater treatment plants use chemical and other disinfection processes to remove and degrade many viruses and bacteria. COVID-19 is inactivated by the disinfection methods used in wastewater treatment.

Reinfection of Covid-19

In general, reinfection means a person was infected (got sick) once, recovered, and then later became infected again. Based on what we know from similar viruses, some reinfections are expected. We are still learning more about COVID-19. Ongoing COVID-19 studies will help us understand:

  • How likely is reinfection

  • How often reinfection occurs

  • How soon after the first infection can reinfection take place

  • How severe are cases of reinfection

  • Who might be at higher risk for reinfection

  • What reinfection means for a person’s immunity

  • If a person is able to spread COVID-19 to other people when reinfected

 

Delta Variant

The Delta variant causes more infections and spreads faster than earlier forms of the virus that causes COVID-19. It might cause more severe illness than previous strains in unvaccinated people.

  • Vaccines continue to be highly effective at preventing hospitalization and death, including against this variant.

  • Fully vaccinated people with breakthrough infections from this variant appear to be infectious for a shorter period.

  • Get vaccinated and wear masks indoors in public spaces to reduce the spread of this variant.

About the Delta Variant in the US

 

What CDC is doing

CDC is actively working to learn more about reinfection to inform public health action. CDC developed recommendations for public health professionals to help decide when and how to test someone for suspected reinfection. CDC has also provided information for state and local health departments to help investigate suspected cases of reinfection. We will update this guidance as we learn more about reinfection.

 

Important Ways to Slow the Spread of COVID-19

Your Covid-19 Vaccination

NOTICE: FDA amended the Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to allow an additional dose to be administered to people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems after an initial 2-dose series. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is meeting on Friday, August 13, 2021, to discuss a recommendation on additional doses for this population.

CDC now recommends that people whose immune systems are compromised moderately to severely should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine after the initial 2 doses. Widespread vaccination is a critical tool to help stop the pandemic. Read CDC’s statement.

 

Your COVID-19 Vaccine

  • COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.

  • Everyone 12 years of age and older is now eligible to get a free COVID-19 vaccination.

  • Learn about the different vaccines available.

  • Search vaccines.gov, text your zip code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find COVID-19 vaccine locations near you.

If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume many activities that you did prior to the pandemic. Learn more about what you can do when you have been fully vaccinated.

Find a COVID-19 Vaccine

How do I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

How Do I Find a Vaccine?

Before You Get the Vaccine

  • Should I get vaccinated if I’ve had COVID-19?

  • Should I take medications before getting the vaccine?

  • Can I have ot20her medical procedures before or after the vaccine?

 

Preparing for Your Vaccine

Vaccine Information for Different Groups of People

  • What if I have allergies?

  • What if I’m pregnant or breastfeeding?

  • What if I’m at risk for severe illness?

Different Groups of People

When You Get the Vaccine

  • What are the possible side effects?

  • Do I need a second shot?

  • Register for v-safe

Getting Your Vaccine

When You've Been Fully Vaccinated

  • How long after my shot am I fully vaccinated?

  • What things can I do after I’m fully vaccinated?

Possible Side Effects After Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Some people have no side effects.

Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccine monitoring has historically shown that side effects generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose. For this reason, the FDA required each of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines to be studied for at least two months (eight weeks) after the final dose.

Common Side Effects

On the arm where you got the shot

  • Pain

  • Redness

  • Swelling

Throughout the rest of your body

  • Tiredness

  • Headache

  • Muscle pain

  • Chills

  • Fever

  • Nausea

If you had a severe or immediate allergic reaction after getting the first dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get a second dose of either of the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. Learn about getting a different type of vaccine after an allergic reaction.

Helpful Tips to Relieve Side Effects

Talk to your doctor about taking over-the-counter medications, such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen, aspirin, or antihistamines, for any pain and discomfort you may experience after getting vaccinated. You can take these medications to relieve post-vaccination side effects if you have no other medical reasons that prevent you from taking these medications normally.

It is not recommended you take these medicines before vaccination for the purpose of trying to prevent side effects.

To reduce pain and discomfort where you got the shot

  • Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area.

  • Use or exercise your arm.

To reduce discomfort from fever

  • Drink plenty of fluids.

  • Dress lightly.

If You Received a Second Shot

Side effects after your second shot may be more intense than the ones you experienced after your first shot. These side effects are normal signs that your body is building protection and should go away within a few days.

When to Call the Doctor

In most cases, discomfort from pain or fever is a normal sign that your body is building protection. Contact your doctor or healthcare provider:

  • If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot gets worse after 24 hours

  • If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days

If you get a COVID-19 vaccine and you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination site, seek immediate medical care by calling 911. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and rare severe allergic reactions.

Remember

  • Side effects can affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.

  • The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine and Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine both need 2 shots in order to get the most protection. You should get the second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor tells you not to get it.

  • You only need 1 shot of the Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine to get the most protection. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.

  • It takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination. People are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, or two weeks after the single-dose J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. You should keep using all the tools available to protect yourself and others until you are fully vaccinated.

  • Millions of people have received COVID-19 vaccines, and no long-term side effects have been detected.

  • CDC continues to closely monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. If scientists find a connection between a safety issue and a vaccine, FDA and the vaccine manufacturer will work toward an appropriate solution to address the specific safety concern (for example, a problem with a specific lot, a manufacturing issue or the vaccine itself).

If you are fully vaccinated, you can participate in many of the activities that you did prior to the pandemic. Learn more about what you can do when you have been fully vaccinated.

If you would like to report an adverse event, side effect or reaction from the COVID-19 vaccine, please use the following link: https://vaers.hhs.gov/external icon

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines

How do I know which COVID-19 vaccine information sources are accurate?

Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors.

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.

 

Bust Common Myths and Learn the Facts

Can receiving a COVID-19 vaccine cause you to be magnetic?

No. Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals.

Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

Do any of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States shed or release any of their components?

No. Vaccine shedding is the term used to describe the release or discharge of any of the vaccine components in or outside of the body. Vaccine shedding can only occur when a vaccine contains a weakened version of the virus. None of the vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contain a live virus. mRNA and viral vector vaccines are the two types of currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines available.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?

Yes. If you are trying to become pregnant now or want to get pregnant in the future, you may get a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available to you.

There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that female or male fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?

No. COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

Will getting a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test?

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​

If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

Learn more about the possibility of COVID-19 illness after vaccination